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Texas Mountain Trail

Texas Mountain Trail Region

Discover the adventure of the true frontier...it awaits you in Far West Texas.

Texas Mountain Trail Region
Texas Mountain Trail Region
Breathtaking mountains and high-country hikes. Sheer river canyons and winding back roads. Exotic panoramas and star-studded nights. Adventure in the unspoiled West awaits you in the Texas Mountain Trail Region of Far West Texas. See land as early man saw it, as the Apache and Comanche saw it, as ranching pioneers saw it. 

Visit Big Bend National Park, hike the spectacular South Rim Trail. Follow the Butterfield Overland Stagecoach route through Guadalupe Mountains National Park. Visit our charming mountain communities, where cowboys may still go to lunch in town on horseback. Catch a performance at El Paso’s 1930 Plaza Theatre, in the heart of the museum district. Visit adobe missions, still used as churches for local congregations. We invite you to plan your own adventure!

Texas Mountain Trail Region
Texas Mountain Trail Region
Travel by car, horse, motorcycle, bicycle, RV, or by foot—the scenery and the history is unparalleled. Let the Texas Mountain Trail be your guide to discovery and adventure. Follow the historic 1960s driving route, the original “Texas Mountain Trail” to state and national parks, to the Big Bend of Texas, where the real West is still alive and ready for you to discover.

Look no further than the rugged land of the Texas Mountain Trail Region, and you’ll see our history. Our state and national parks—“bucket list” destinations for most geologists—reveal a past of more than 600 million years of Paleozoic deep marine sediments, volcanic remnants, and the bending, folding, and uplifting of land. Dinosaurs roamed our land some 248 million years ago, and Big Bend National Park is one of the world’s paleontological jewels of the world.

In our Chihuahuan Desert climate, where there is water, there is the history of man. The Rio Grande gradually carved a deep notch in the mountains, creating a natural river crossing the Spanish explorers named El Paso del Norte. The river also created glorious canyons in Big Bend National Park. Throughout the centuries, the climate grew hotter and the land drier. To survive, wildlife and prehistoric hunter-gatherers adapted to desert conditions. Later, diverse groups—Native Americans and Spanish missionaries, soldiers and miners, ranchers and railroaders—passed this way in search of wealth, glory and new beginnings.

 


Texas Mountain Trail